A year later, A Better Ubisoft says none of its demands have been met


A year ago today, the “A Better Ubisoft” group penned an open letter in solidarity with Activision Blizzard workers which also called out Ubisoft’s own management for its handling of misconduct scandals in the past.


This group has been campaigning for improved working conditions since the company was hit with allegations of a toxic work environment, including numerous accounts of sexual harassment and assault concerning multiple employees at the company.


However, the group says, its demands for change have not been met despite Ubisoft boss Yves Guillemot vowing he would do “everything in [his] power to ensure that everyone… feels welcomed, respected, and safe”.


So, one year on, A Better Ubisoft has now shared another update addressing its concerns.

In a Twitter thread, the group revealed that 25 percent of those who signed its letter 12 months ago have since left the company. 60 percent of those that quit use he/him pronouns, while 39 percent use she/her and one percent use they/them.


A Better Ubisoft states this now means that women represent only 25.4 percent of Ubisoft’s global workforce.


“We are massively disproportionately losing women who signed our open letter calling for more action to tackle abuse,” the group wrote.


Following this statement, it once more laid out its demands to create a better Ubisoft and end abuse in gaming. These demands are:

  • Stop promoting, and moving known offenders from studio to studio, team to team with no repercussions. This cycle needs to end.
  • We want a collective seat at the table, to have a meaningful say in how Ubisoft as a company moves forward from here.
  • Cross-industry collaboration, to agree to a set of ground rules and processes that all studios can use to handle these offences in the future.
  • This collaboration must heavily involve employees in non-management positions and union representatives.

The group similarly gave an update on Ubisoft’s work environment 200 days after the open letter first demanded change.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.