Urus turns four, Lamborghini gets all the presents

Last weekend saw the fourth anniversary of Lamborghini launching the Urus “Super SUV”, a vehicle that has boosted the Italian supercar manufacturer incredibly in the years since its launch.

Regardless of your attitude towards sports car and supercar makers building SUVs, it is an inarguable fact that they are the path to some serious profit, with the likes of Aston Martin and now even Ferrari scrambling to get in on the SUV act.

After all, the first of them – the Porsche Cayenne – is the only reason Porsche still exists, and the Urus has massively increased Lamborghini’s profitability.

In the four years since Lamborghini launched the Urus it has been a massive success for the company.

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In the four years since Lamborghini launched the Urus it has been a massive success for the company.

Thanks to the Urus, Lamborghini’s sales, turnover and profitability reached unprecedented levels in the brand’s history over the last four years, with turnover growing 40 per cent from just over €1 billion to €1.4 billion in 2018, the year sales of the car began, reaching a peak of €1.81 billion in 2019 and €1.61 billion in 2020 (dropping thanks to Covid), the year of record profitability for the company.

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Lamborghini’s overall growth in global sales because of the Urus is even more impressive, reaching a record of 8,205 Lamborghinis delivered to customers in 2019: double the volumes achieved in the period before the arrival of the SUV.

Lamborghini has doubled the size of its facilities since launching the Urus.

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Lamborghini has doubled the size of its facilities since launching the Urus.

From 2018 to the end of 2021, a total of 16,000 Urus were delivered worldwide, a figure that established the Super SUV as the best-selling model over four years in the company’s history. The Urus is sold in every corner of five continents, with 85 per cent of buyers being new to the marque.

Thanks to the sales success of the Urus, Lamborghini has also doubled the size of its Sant’Agata Bolognese production site, which grew from 80,000 to 160,000 square metres with the creation of a new facility and paintshop, as well as the new finishing department, new office building, test track, new logistics warehouse, a second trigeneration plant and an energy hub.

The company hired more than 700 new staff over the last four years as well.

Sorry Urus; you might be Lamborghini’s most important SUV, but its first – the LM002 ‘Rambo Lambo’ – is the coolest by a long way.

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Sorry Urus; you might be Lamborghini’s most important SUV, but its first – the LM002 ‘Rambo Lambo’ – is the coolest by a long way.

Of course, the Urus does have the serious performance credentials to back up the badge on its nose, being powered by a 478kW/850Nm version of the VW Group’s mighty 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8 engine. The Urus can accelerate from 0 to 100kmh in 3.6 seconds and can reach a top speed of 305kmh.

And Lamborghini has pushed the Urus to some strange extremes to prove its worth as well, setting a speed record on ice on Lake Baikal in Russia in March 2021, with a top speed of 298kmh and an average speed from a standing start of 114kmh over 1000 metres.

Also in 2021, the Urus reached the highest motorable road in the world at the top of the Umling La Pass in the Himalayan part of India in the Jammu and Kashmir region, more than 5800 metres above sea level, which is actually higher than the Mount Everest base camp.

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